Tal Cohen's Bookshelf: A Collection of Personal Opinions about Books

Camille J writes:
Would an athiest like this book & the others in the Trilogy?
I am considering reading this trilogy-- I grew up on classic Sci Fi, & have always been intrigued by this set of books because of the cool illustrations on the covers of the set edition published ca. the 1960s. I want to expand my 'read [past tense] bookshelf' of classic Sci Fi's, so am considering reading this set. But, in researching C.S. Lewis, I've learned that he was very religious & that his religious-ness profoundly affected his writing. I've been an atheist since I was 14-- so my question is-- and this is put to other atheists: did you enjoy this set of books? Was the religious-ness of them so obvious & so overbearing that they were irritating to read? Did the books offer other intriguing ideas & concepts that sufficiently offset the religious overtones? (My fave book of all time is 'Men, Martians and Machines' by Eric Frank Russell cuz it's 'Hard Sci Fi' & has many intriguing ideas/concepts.)

Thanks in advance,
CJ
[399] Posted on Friday, 03 July 2009 at 3:44 GMT [Reply to this] [Permalink]


Tal Cohen writes in reply to Camille J:
Would an athiest like this book & the others in the Trilogy?
That really depends... Do you enjoy soft-core SF, at all? SF that focuses on philosophical questions, more than science and technology? If so, you might enjoy the first and third books. The second book, Perelandra, you might find tiresome (parts of it read like chapters from Psalms).
[400] Posted on Friday, 03 July 2009 at 5:51 GMT [Reply to this] [Permalink]


Adam writes in reply to Camille J:
Would an athiest like this book & the others in the Trilogy?
You should never let your religious bias prevent you from reading good literature. Whether you agree with the subject matter or philosophies within is irrelevant to the fact that you will, at the very least, be entertained. If you are an atheist then there should be more reason to read CS Lewis, because if your mind is firm in what you believe, then his wisdom will not deter you from your beliefs. However, you may find a perspective that you have not yet thought of, and to give that up would be like a beggar passing up gold.
[407] Posted on Wednesday, 26 August 2009 at 2:30 GMT [Reply to this] [Permalink]


Jeremy writes in reply to Camille J:
Would an athiest like this book & the others in the Trilogy?
Lewis was an atheist at your age too.

As he grew in understanding, he became first a theist and then a Christian.
[570] Posted on Saturday, 06 March 2010 at 18:32 GMT [Reply to this] [Permalink]


(anonymous) writes in reply to Camille J:
Would an athiest like this book & the others in the Trilogy?
I am reading the series for a school project, and while I am a qasi-atheist, I thought that the christian views expressed was just another learning experience, where you can experience how religions function.
[680] Posted on Friday, 15 April 2011 at 3:23 GMT [Reply to this] [Permalink]

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